New Star Blogs

Effects of Eastern plant slowdown felt across Continent.

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The sud­den inter­rup­tion of activ­i­ties at a print­ing plant in Que­bec with two New Star titles on press in late March has had reper­cus­sions in Mon­tre­al, Van­cou­ver, and even Toron­to.

Press­es were inked for The Small­est Objec­tive, by Sharon Kirsch, and Hun­gry Sling­shots, by Louis Cabri, and books were sched­uled for deliv­ery in time for their announced pub­li­ca­tion date of April 23, when our print­er announced the sud­den hia­tus. There has been no imme­di­ate date set for work to resume at the plant, and the pub­li­ca­tion date for both titles has been post­poned indef­i­nite­ly. The world’s bib­lio­data­bas­es are being told July 30, sim­ply because they won’t take “don’t know” for an answer. That date could change.

The Toron­to launch for The Small­est Objec­tive at Queen Books, in author Sharon Kirsch’s home­town of Toron­to, orig­i­nal­ly pre­dict­ed for May 6, has also been post­poned indef­i­nite­ly, as has a launch in Mon­tre­al, where the events described in The Small­est Objec­tive take place.

In Wind­sor, poet-schol­ar Louis Cabri, while obvi­ous­ly dis­ap­point­ed at not being able to hit the road in sup­port of his lat­est, Hun­gry Sling­shots, told inter­view­ers that he intends to walk on the road instead, and around his emp­ty neigh­bour­hood, winc­ing if the wood­peck­ers hit met­al, while read­ing Some mag­a­zine, when he’s not read­ing A Flea the Size of Paris, or spend­ing time improv­ing his inter­net eti­quette.

While mate­r­i­al con­di­tions pre­vent us from pub­lish­ing the print edi­tions at this time, there are no such bar­ri­ers to releas­ing The Small­est Objec­tive in its e-book for­mat on sched­ule. If you are one of the grow­ing mul­ti­tude who have embraced the elec­tron­ic book, well, you can get your vir­tu­al hands on it, here (Kin­dle) and here (Kobo).

We might take this oppor­tu­ni­ty to men­tion, in pass­ing as it were, that we’re quite proud of our mod­est but grow­ing lit­tle shelf of e-books. They make an attrac­tive dis­play. You might wan­na take a quick look inside (because you can!) some of these intrigu­ing titles:

 

Anar­chy Explained to My Father, by Fran­cis Dupuis-Deri & Thomas Deri

Kin­dle ::  Kobo

 

The Briss, by Michael Trege­bov

Kin­dle :: Kobo

 

The Shi­va, by Michael Trege­bov

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Shot Rock, by Michael Trege­bov

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Burn­ing Water, by George Bow­er­ing

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Caprice, by George Bow­er­ing

Kin­dle ::  Kobo

 

Shoot! by George Bow­er­ing

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Writ­ing and Read­ing, by George Bow­er­ing

Kin­dle ::  Kobo

 

Cul­ture Gap: Towards a New Life in the Yalakom Val­ley, by Judith Plant

Kin­dle ::  Kobo

 

Dance Moves of the Near Future, by Tim Con­ley

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Great­ly Exag­ger­at­ed: The Myth of the Death of News­pa­pers, by Marc Edge

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Mac-Pap: Mem­oirs of a Cana­di­an in the Span­ish Civ­il War, by Ronald Liv­ersedge

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

More House, by Han­nah Calder

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Piranesi’s Fig­ures, by Han­nah Calder

Kin­dle ::  Kobo

 

A Series of Dogs, by John Arm­strong

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Wages, by John Arm­strong

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Sit­ting Shi­va on Minto Avenue, by Toots, by Erín Moure

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Sovi­et Prince­ton: Slim Evans and the 1932–33 Min­ers’ Strike, by Jon Bartlett & Rika Rueb­saat

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Svend Robin­son: A Life in Pol­i­tics, by Graeme Tru­elove

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Sweet Eng­land, by Steve Wein­er

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

The Woman in the Trees, by Ger­ry William

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

Whose Cul­ture is It, Any­way? Com­mu­ni­ty Engage­ment in Small Cities, by W.F. Gar­rett-Petts, James Hoff­man, and Gin­ny Rat­soy (eds.)

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo

 

The Small­est Objec­tive, by Sharon Kirsch

Kin­dle  ::  Kobo